One Word that can Transform Your Business… And Your Life

29 11 2012

The year is winding down and for many companies thoughts start focusing on a new year.  Maybe you are taking the time to review where you have been, where you are and where you want to go.  Are you happy with the results?  Do you wish your business was improving?  If it is doing well, do you want to reduce the stress and challenges that growth creates?  Do you always want to improve?

The ability to be better, and happier, with our business, our people and our personal lives can be boiled down to one word: GIVE.  That too may be top of mind since we are in the holiday season.  However, giving should not just be limited to one time of year.  Giving has implications that lead to success and happiness.  While giving is often associated with money, there are other ways that can make an even greater impact.

  • Give your TIME – Spend it where it matters most to you.  Time is a valuable commodity that equates to more than money because once it is spent, we can never get it back.  Give time to a cause, spend it with family, even give some to yourself.  Make every minute count.
  • Give your ATTENTION – All of us are guilty of not being in the moment at times.  When you are with someone, do more than occupy the same room.  Give them your attention and they will give you theirs.
  • Give your WORK – Doing too much?  Probably.  Are there others who can do the task?  Almost definitely.  Leaders often take on too much with the notion that no one else can do things as well as they can.  Take some of that time and give someone the tools to potentially do it better.  They learn and in the future you will have more time to use the way you want.
  • Give a MEMORY – People have grown to expect the mundane.  Give them something they will remember.  Money fades, but an experience will provide memories that last a lifetime.  Your customers will appreciate it and keep coming back.  Your employees will love it and you will make them happier while keeping them longer.
  • Give your RESOURCES – Time.  Talent.  Money.  All can make a difference for someone else who has less.  Find a cause that has meaning to you.  The personal rewards will be great, and that impact can resonate for years.  The difference you make improves the community in which you live.
  • Give your KNOWLEDGE – Give someone a fish they eat for a day.  Teach someone to fish, you feed them for a lifetime.  Enough said.
  • Give THANKS – Many are wired into what is wrong.  Thank yous have become a rarity.  Thank people more.  Give thanks to someone for unexpected reasons.  When they do a great job.  For their dedication. For sticking with you during the tough times.  Showing gratitude to others will bring that gratitude back to you ten fold.
  • Give a PURPOSE – People want to matter.  They want to feel important.  Remind them why they are here and how they bring value to you, your customers, and your company.  Let them contribute in matters that impact sales and profits.  Let them take managed risks.  Embrace their strengths and mentor them to success.  Your influence could change the life of someone more than you know.

It has been said the more you give the more you get.  What you get cannot be measured by money alone yet it could make the difference between having an average year or a stellar year in 2013.  Need a better understanding of how to implement this?  GIVE me a call.





The Only Constant Thing

5 11 2012

It’s remarkable how many people spend valuable time and energy fighting against change. I assume you know the people I’m talking about. If not, they’re relatively easy to spot: they treat new ideas with the same enthusiasm you and I would show for a root canal. Without Novocain.

Remarkable is probably not the right word insomuch as the word has a positive connotation. Consider how much change we go through in a relatively short period of time. In my adulthood (not my whole life, just adulthood, mind you) I’ve seen the following:

  • The music industry was nearly knocked out by a computer company.
  • Computers have shrunk to the size of a wallet.
  • Soda serving sizes have increased to the size of a small cooler.
  • Smoking has become just slightly more acceptable than hardcore drug use.
  • Airport security x-rays me more than my doctor and dentist combined.

Book writing switched to the computer. Then book shopping. And now, book reading is too.
The list could go on and on, but the point is that change is occurring at a pace that would have made our forefathers dizzy. And while I’m not well-equipped to accurately predict the next big change, I’m comfortable with the statement that the pace will only accelerate from here.

There’s basically two camps when it comes to change: the ones that love it and the ones that hate it. I fit into the first camp and that has some drawbacks. For starters, people who change too much are seen as unstable. That said, I think the second camp has a tougher road to travel.

So if you’re in that camp, or you have an abundance of employees there, you’re going to have to figure out how to embrace the constant change in chunks that aren’t overwhelming. One suggestion is to create a list like I did above. It’s amazing how much we’ve seen in the last 20 years, yet I rarely recognized the impact while it was happening. I just knew it was typically an improvement in some way. That makes me hopeful about the “next thing”.





Facebook Reminds Us How Difficult Change Can Be

22 09 2011

If you have been on Facebook in the last 24 hours you might have noticed some differences.  If you have not, I am sure many of your Facebook friends will inform you.  Yesterday, Facebook made some significant updates to their page and news feed causing many users to cry foul.  Facebook says the changes are to improve user experience and make it easier to stay connected.  The users, however, find the new layout confusing with the absence of some features they had grown accustomed to.

But this is not about Facebook’s change as much as it is an observation about change in general.  Though we are in a continually evolving world where change comes at us faster than ever before, we often wish things would remain as they have been.  I remember these experiences when I worked in the corporate world.  A change would be sent down by management and one of the following would happen:

  • Backlash – “That’s not part of my job!”, “This doesn’t make any sense!”, “I’m telling my boss this isn’t right!”
  • Sabotage – People will set out to make sure the new way will not work
  • Complacency – This is the “flavor of the month” and this too shall pass
  • Collusion – Water cooler huddles dissing management or anyone who agrees with the change
  • Resistance – Flat out refusal to try the new method
  • Acceptance – This is a rare bird.  Some think it is extinct
  • Embrace – Some actually see the benefits and not only look forward to the change, but may actually take the lead on making the change better (even rarer than acceptance)

As you can imagine most of our wiring around change is that it is negative.  I am sure there are many reasons for this, but the fact is we will go through countless changes in out life.  As leaders, we will ask others to be part of change.

There are things that can help make change a little easier in our organizations.  Here are a few things you might try:

  1. Inform and educate – Appeal to the reason why the change needs to happen.  Focus on outcomes, benefits and desired results
  2. Enroll staff – Change that happens behind closed doors and then sprung on its participants can lead to revolt.  Whenever possible, incorporate informal leaders into the process.  Find the people who can influence the change one way or another.  If they own it, they can help create a positive message.
  3. Deal with the emotional issues related to change – Fear is a powerful factor in any change process.  Often people’s minds go to the worst case scenario.  Address those concerns early on.  Get feedback.  Seek advice and if someone has a different idea, let them research it if possible.
  4. Whenever possible, be transparent – work people in to a new way of thinking by sharing information.  If you are holding back because you are worried what people will think, don’t be surprised if that is the outcome you create.
  5. Work on behaviors around change – Coaching and mentoring is involved here.  Help people develop the skills necessary to do and think differently.
  6. Create a change culture – Empowered leadership, empowered staff, a clear direction where to go, and focusing on the positives can go a long way to making change a regular part of your business model.  Get people thinking.  Teach creativity skills as much as you would technical  skills.  Tap into that entrepreneurial spirit that your organization had when it was young and everything was constantly different.  Make people the catalyst for moving forward!

The bottom line is change can be easy or difficult.  Often we choose to make it the latter.  Each of us have embraced quick and dramatic change in our lives yet we still adapt and move on.   In many cases that change wasn’t as bad as we originally thought.  So while I can’t change Facebook, I can change my attitude.  And if something as small as Facebook can throw you into a tizzy, how are you going to do against greater changes needed in your business or your life?








%d bloggers like this: