Seven Steps to Ending Disruptive Behavior in the Workplace

27 09 2011

Can a productive employee actually cost you business?  I am reminded of words that were shared with me some time ago; “People are hired for their technical expertise and fired for their behavior.”  That is just as true today.  I have noticed a trend on this subject recently.

After a morning meeting with a client, we discovered that a productive employee has cost her business around $370,000 dollars in lost revenue.  Yes, that is correct.  This lost revenue is because the employee in question has driven away even higher producing members of her sales team.  These people have gone to work for the competitor and have taken business with them.  The difference in the disruptive employee’s production vs. the people who have left works out to be $370,000 in gross dollars.  That is pretty significant.  And often these costs are hidden because we often don’t measure the impact of one person’s productivity against a group.

Business leaders need to protect themselves against what I call disruptive behavior which is when an individual, or group, negatively impact the productivity of the rest of the workforce.  Steps to correct behavior may be taken too late or dealt with incorrectly.  In a few cases, the negative behavior is ignored which creates critical problems that are difficult to correct.

If you are experiencing disruptive behavior, you should take the following actions:

  1. Address the problem immediately – Take action now instead of waiting to see if the problem will correct itself.  When issues aren’t dealt with right away, they send messages to your good employees that you don’t care.  This can lead to frustration, anger, lost productivity, poor service, and poor quality.
  2. Keep emotion out of the discussion – Taking corrective action when you are angry or upset will only lead to an argument.  Handle the situation rationally and stay focused on the facts.  Address examples of the behaviors observed  and focus on the desired behaviors.
  3. Act as a coach, not a disciplinarian – Sometimes we may come across like the scolding parent.  If you know how well your kids listen when you act like that, imagine how an adult will be.  Open a dialog, ask questions, enroll the individual in how they can be part of the solution.
  4. Get both sides – Find out what is going on with the employee that might be leading to their disruptive behavior.  Are their actions caused by their own frustrations?  Is there something personal going on that is reflecting in their work habits?  Understand their side of the problem and help them come up with their solution.
  5. Keep it positive and keep it real – Maintain your focus on desired outcomes.  Keep the conversation as positive as possible yet don’t let people off the hook or make excuses for bad behavior.  The moment you make the poor performance acceptable, you can expect to see more of it.
  6. Establish follow up and accountability – Often bad behavior continues because no action is taken past the discussion.  When dealing with behavioral issues, it is not possible to make immediate corrections to someone’s attitude.  Continued follow up is needed.  Check in with the person.  Make sure they are continually working towards change and they know you are there to support them.  Reinforce desired behaviors over only recognizing poor ones.  Catch them doing good things because most people only hear when they screw up.  Whatever you place your focus on will grow.
  7. Encourage open dialog between staff members – Though this takes time, building trust and open communication between team members is an effective way to prevent performance issues.  Consistent leadership and positive behavior on your part will reinforce the culture and the group will start self-policing their own actions.  Trust people will do the right things and in most cases they will.  Just don’t forget to follow up and verify the right actions are happening.

Taking these steps can increase the performance of your workforce and reduce the time you spend dealing with disruptive issues.  Make sure you do your part as a leader to not only make this the best customer environment, but also the best work environment.





Facebook Reminds Us How Difficult Change Can Be

22 09 2011

If you have been on Facebook in the last 24 hours you might have noticed some differences.  If you have not, I am sure many of your Facebook friends will inform you.  Yesterday, Facebook made some significant updates to their page and news feed causing many users to cry foul.  Facebook says the changes are to improve user experience and make it easier to stay connected.  The users, however, find the new layout confusing with the absence of some features they had grown accustomed to.

But this is not about Facebook’s change as much as it is an observation about change in general.  Though we are in a continually evolving world where change comes at us faster than ever before, we often wish things would remain as they have been.  I remember these experiences when I worked in the corporate world.  A change would be sent down by management and one of the following would happen:

  • Backlash – “That’s not part of my job!”, “This doesn’t make any sense!”, “I’m telling my boss this isn’t right!”
  • Sabotage – People will set out to make sure the new way will not work
  • Complacency – This is the “flavor of the month” and this too shall pass
  • Collusion – Water cooler huddles dissing management or anyone who agrees with the change
  • Resistance – Flat out refusal to try the new method
  • Acceptance – This is a rare bird.  Some think it is extinct
  • Embrace – Some actually see the benefits and not only look forward to the change, but may actually take the lead on making the change better (even rarer than acceptance)

As you can imagine most of our wiring around change is that it is negative.  I am sure there are many reasons for this, but the fact is we will go through countless changes in out life.  As leaders, we will ask others to be part of change.

There are things that can help make change a little easier in our organizations.  Here are a few things you might try:

  1. Inform and educate – Appeal to the reason why the change needs to happen.  Focus on outcomes, benefits and desired results
  2. Enroll staff – Change that happens behind closed doors and then sprung on its participants can lead to revolt.  Whenever possible, incorporate informal leaders into the process.  Find the people who can influence the change one way or another.  If they own it, they can help create a positive message.
  3. Deal with the emotional issues related to change – Fear is a powerful factor in any change process.  Often people’s minds go to the worst case scenario.  Address those concerns early on.  Get feedback.  Seek advice and if someone has a different idea, let them research it if possible.
  4. Whenever possible, be transparent – work people in to a new way of thinking by sharing information.  If you are holding back because you are worried what people will think, don’t be surprised if that is the outcome you create.
  5. Work on behaviors around change – Coaching and mentoring is involved here.  Help people develop the skills necessary to do and think differently.
  6. Create a change culture – Empowered leadership, empowered staff, a clear direction where to go, and focusing on the positives can go a long way to making change a regular part of your business model.  Get people thinking.  Teach creativity skills as much as you would technical  skills.  Tap into that entrepreneurial spirit that your organization had when it was young and everything was constantly different.  Make people the catalyst for moving forward!

The bottom line is change can be easy or difficult.  Often we choose to make it the latter.  Each of us have embraced quick and dramatic change in our lives yet we still adapt and move on.   In many cases that change wasn’t as bad as we originally thought.  So while I can’t change Facebook, I can change my attitude.  And if something as small as Facebook can throw you into a tizzy, how are you going to do against greater changes needed in your business or your life?





Sometimes the Best Way to Win is by Finishing Third

19 09 2011

I had the pleasure of hearing Malcolm Gladwell speak last week at a tech conference in Milwaukee.  You may be familiar with his books, which include The Tipping Point, Outliers, and What the Dog Saw.   Mr. Gladwell opened his discussion with the Bekaa Valley Air Battle which took place in 1982.  Considered one of the most lopsided battles in military history, the air battle represented the use of modern warfare which saw the Israelis decimate their Lebanese foes in just a few short days.  The mismatch was so bad that it has been labeled “The Bekaa Valley Turkey Shoot”.

What Mr. Gladwell recognized here was Israel didn’t use any technology they developed.  Instead they mastered what others had innovated.  For example, the Soviets were master strategists.  Their centralized power allowed them to bring great minds together to think of the best ways to fight in modern warfare.  However the Soviets did not possess the technology their strategy utilized.  The Americans are a different case.  Their fractioned yet highly entrepreneurial military had developed many of the technologies and weapons necessary to successfully lead the fight.  By combining the best of the two, the Israeli military was able to carry out an attack with such precision, they completely shut down the Lebanese.

We often place too much emphasis on our need to be first in the race.  Yet in many businesses where the business model may be new or evolving, it can actually be better to enter third.  Mr. Gladwell pointed out that Steve Jobs and Apple have been the best at this.  They weren’t really the first to develop anything.  What they did do was take the idea and make it better.

The most important phrase Mr. Gladwell shared was culture dictates innovation.  If you have the right culture, you can do great things.  What you need to do is create a culture that will allow you to be successful.  Yet cultures can be difficult to change.  As leaders, it is necessary to take the time to define what you want to become.  The direction you take your business is the choice of you and your culture.  What direction is it taking you?





A Laundry List to Accomplish Through Five Steps

15 09 2011

In a recent client meeting we were reviewing the business numbers and talking about the next steps for the growth of the operation when the subject of incentives came up. During our talk, the owner asked if the incentive package could be repeatable in another company. My answer: it depends. This led to an in depth talk about why some companies can be highly successful and others not.

My client, the owner of a very successful business as well as a grand inquisitor asked me to define what made his current revenue sharing so successful. I threw the question back at him. I said, “First, why don’t you tell me what has to happen in order for your plan to work?” Through this, an extensive list was built:

  • The current business has no debt
  • They have highly productive people working
  • There is a culture of empowerment to get things done
  • They are Mission/Vision centered
  • They developed a pattern of growth
  • The leadership character of the owner
  • No assumptions are made. Evidence supports the program.
  • Problems are dealt with immediately
  • Everyone in the organization is treated as important
  • Loyalty matters (to customers and also vendors)
  • Team will go above and beyond because they are respected
  • Communication is high
  • There is trust in the environment
  • Outside support through mentoring and coaching
  • Owner is willing to be coached
  • Owner knows his weakness
  • Owner knows his Vision for the business

We addressed that because there are a lot of things working right, his compensation is successful where in other places it might never pay out. This brought up a greater observation; there are a lot of things that make organizations successful and if it weren’t for several factors impacting all these outcomes, the business wouldn’t be where it is today.

Many business leaders focus on the laundry list that needs to be accomplished. Yet even with a large list such as this, it can all be running right with just a few simple practices.

  1. A Vision-centric culture. Everyone knows what the organization stands for, what they will accomplish and how their role plays into accomplishing that goal.
  2. Goal focused and communication driven. Each person knows what they need to achieve and there is ongoing communication to help them succeed.
  3. The right people. people matter. Period. When leadership has the right behavior and people work from a position of strength and empowerment, amazing things can be accomplished. The wrong people or even the right people doing the wrong things can be costly.
  4. Working process that is always a work in progress. In an environment of change where people are continually taught and updating best practices makes for a winning combination. By honoring systems for their consistency, but being willing to question everything for improvement, people are able to maintain a high level of productivity.
  5. Measures that mean something. Data is abundant. The right data is far more important. Knowing what to measure, how to measure it and empowering people to be accountable and track their data, team members are able to help reach their targets as well as the growth goals of the company.

By following these steps, business leaders are able to develop great performance along with happy, engaged employees. What is your laundry list and how will you be tackling it?





Why I Love What I Do. (And Why You Should Love What You Do Too!)

13 09 2011

I am pretty lucky. I have a business where I get to work with great people every day. As part of what I do, I am able to help my clients build wealth, grow their business into an appreciable asset, and reduce some of the stresses caused by various leadership challenges. The greatest blessing is doing what I love. Each day I get to utilize my talents to help make other people’s lives richer. But isn’t that what we all want?

Some of us get stuck in jobs that don’t make us happy. They can feel lost, trapped, or unmotivated. Their ability to shine with their true gifts are doused by the fear that doing anything different would lead to financial ruin. After all, we are all told how bad the economy is out there. What if you could put that fear aside for a moment? If you could do anything you wanted in life, what would you do? What is currently getting in your way?

These were all questions I faced over seven years ago before launching this company. That time was scary. After all, being on your own takes away any safety net that you have. To me, what was more important was doing what I wanted to do. What I could be the best at. I wanted to enjoy getting up every day and dealing with new challenges. This business has given me that opportunity and I am glad to have taken the risk. If you are in a position that is not fulfilling, there are things you can do to avoid feeling trapped. Making the effort and choosing your path can be the most rewarding thing, but only if you take the steps necessary to be successful.

  1. Do a talent inventory – Know what you are the best at.  Figure out what you enjoy doing.
  2. Make it profitable – Just because you are good at something doesn’t mean it will be profitable.  Figure out how to make money doing what you love.  There’s enough starving artists out there and you shouldn’t be one of them.
  3. Have your plan – Know how you are going to find customers and how you are going to grow your business.  Failure to have a plan can leave you as an employee in your own company.  Seek ways to build wealth so your efforts can be multiplied.  This is the biggest challenge most small business owners face.
  4. Pursue life-long learning – Educate yourself.  Seek knowledge.  Grow your mental strengths.  There is a lot of free information out there, but don’t be afraid to pay for the right knowledge.
  5. Surround yourself with successful people – There is no shortage of people who will shoot down your dreams.  Find those who will lift you up and support you.  Join entrepreneur groups, mastermind groups, leadership groups, or mentor programs.  Find someone to help keep you on track and focused on your goals.  Learn from them to avoid mistakes that could cause you hardship.

Taking these five steps can be very helpful in your career growth.  These skills will be necessary whether or not you are planning on going into business for yourself.  Do what you can to eliminate your fears and do what you love doing.  You will be happier for it





The Impact of September 11

12 09 2011

Yesterday marks 10 years since the terrorist attacks in New York, Washington DC, and the failed attempt which led to the crash of flight 93 in Pennsylvania. Over the past week, many of my friends and colleagues have reflected on this event and how it changed our world. Like many, I can remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when the news first broke. In the weeks following the incident, we became a unified nation committed to overcoming our differences and moving forward through our pain. Ten years later, life has moved on. The pain and grief are still there though more subdued compared to a decade ago.

Though our world changed, we still enjoy a good quality of life here and we owe much to those who have given their lives for the freedom we sometimes take for granted. Today we face new challenges with mounting debt and a sluggish economy. These too can be overcome if we commit to the same resolve we had on that fateful day. It involves each of us taking an active role in growing this nation. We must be accountable. We must be responsible and we must use our strengths to innovate and compete on a global scale. I hope we can learn how to come together to get things done much like our grandparents did in World War II. They sparked a growth in this nation that continued a generation of prosperity. We too have to tap into that work ethic and provide direction and leadership not only for this generation, but future ones as well. Remember September 11. Remember how it unified us towards a common cause and let’s apply that to the other challenges we now face.





Is Leadership Killing Your Company?

7 09 2011

Recently I had the chance to touch base with a long-time client who had taken a leadership role in a new company. I had worked with his previous organization for about four years until he left for a new opportunity. This was my chance to see what differences he noticed in the new business.

The company he is working for now is in the same industry as the last place he worked with a noticeable difference. The current organization has struggled while the company he came from was doing quite well. For the past few years, his current employer has been in a constant state of transition. He is the third president in about as many years. Business is down and morale is down.

This person is no stranger to building a company up. For the past ten years he had improved the performance of the business to make it a market leader. He did observe some new challenges here. As we began to talk about the people he was working with, he pointed out this group had never seen success and wondered if they had the confidence in their organization. Many of the employees had not worked here long. Most staff members had only worked here a few years compared to over ten at his last company. He observed that overall, the energy of the staff seemed low.

My client knew the history of most of the employees and many had come from other struggling companies. What added to the challenge was the commitment of the leadership team here. He pointed out that his leaders didn’t seem to have the same level of care as in his past company. By his opinion, they had taken much of what they were doing for granted. What’s worse is the problem was somebody else’s fault. Whether it be the economy or a poor performing employee, the leadership didn’t take ownership and weren’t accountable. This meant a lot of hand holding by the president followed by a lot of frustration.

People are the most important asset to any organization. Yet leadership is absolutely critical to gaining the most value out of that asset. When leadership fails, the company is sure to follow. My client knows this and is taking steps to improve the problem. Unfortunately there is a lot of repair work that needs to be done from the shortcomings of past managers.

What challenges do you face with leadership in your company? Top level executives know the strengths and weaknesses of their direct reports, but are they doing most to strengthen their skills? Much like a stone tossed into a pond, the impact of leadership creates ripples throughout the entire organization. We may take for granted a leaders lack of skills and hope they improve on their own, but do they ever? Coach, mentor, and be accountable. Most important, make others accountable as well. What you save in time and expense up front could cost you greatly in the end.








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